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Data reveals the driving offences sending premiums racing up

Look out! These are the driving offences driving up your premiums the most:

DVLA Offence code18 year old average yearly insurance30 year old average yearly insurancePrice increase (%) 18 -> 30Price increase 18 -> 30
Driving under the influence of alcohol £17,978.24£1,611.491015.63%£16,366.75
Dangerous driving £17,786.72£1,866.20853.10%£15,920.52
Driving without valid insurance£9,278.66£1,626.45470.49%£7,652.21
Failure to comply with traffic signal £6,158.68£1,484.86314.77%£4,673.82
Using a mobile phone while driving £6,158.68£1,582.17289.25%£4,576.50
Exceeding the speed limit £5,720.35£1,329.15330.38%£4,391.20
Parking offences £5,720.35£1,329.15330.38%£4,391.20
Careless driving £6,158.68£1,768.89248.17%£4,389.79
Driving without a valid license£5,720.35£1,569.13264.56%£4,151.22
No offences£4,121.78£904.06355.92%£3,217.72

If you are 18 years old and convicted of driving under the influence of alcohol (DR10), expect to fork out £16,366 more for insurance than a 30-year-old who committed the same offence. This is a staggering 1,015% increase in costs for young drivers, amounting to a sobering £17,978 if caught drink driving. The DR10 offence stands out as the costliest, with 18-year-old offenders being charged over four times the insurance costs compared to their clean-driving counterparts of the same age (£4,121).

Not far behind, dangerous driving (DD10) could cost young drivers a wallet busting £17,786 – an 853% spike in costs compared to 30-year-olds facing the same offence who bear roughly one-tenth of that amount (£1,866).

The third biggest red flag for car insurers is driving without valid insurance (IN10), bumping up insurance premiums for 18-year-olds by £7,652 compared to 30-year-olds. Younger drivers convicted are expected to shell out around £9,278 for car insurance – approximately six times more than the amount paid by older drivers with the same driving record (£1,626).

Failure to comply with traffic signals and using a mobile phone while driving rank among the most expensive violations for 18-year-olds, resulting in yearly insurance premiums of £6,158. New drivers of the same age could have saved around £2,037 with a clean driving record. If convicted, be prepared to be quoted an extra £4,624 on average for insurance, compared to 30-year-old counterparts.

Even with a clean driving record, 18-year-olds (£4,121) are expected to pay roughly five times more than 30-year-olds whose yearly car insurance costs a mere £904.

Amid painful price hikes hitting young drivers hard, Connor Campbell, an expert at Independent Advisor Car Insurance, offered his advice on cutting down insurance costs for new drivers:

“Insurance accounts for 66% of the total costs for young drivers running a car. This higher expense has become inevitable for less experienced drivers to offset the increased risk of claims absorbed by insurers.

“However, driving doesn’t have to be financially out of reach for younger drivers. For starters, always shop around before committing to a company – insurers don’t price their policies the same so get savvy and compare quotes from multiple providers to snag the best deal available. Besides, adding a trustworthy person with several years of driving under the belt to your policy, and reducing your mileage can also bring down the cost of your cover as this signals to providers that you, as a riskier driver, won’t always be behind the wheel, or won’t be on the road as frequently.

When getting your first car, it’s also important to consider the insurance group the vehicle falls into. All cars are categorised into insurance groups from one (cheapest) to 50 (most expensive). Models like the Fiat Panda, Ford Ka Plus or Nissan Micra are in Group 1, making them the most affordable to insure. Opting for an older or second-hand vehicle could also lower your insurance premium due to the car’s decreased value.“

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